Montefalco

Because of its location, Montefalco is known as the "Balcony of Umbria" and is at the heart of the Clitunno, Topino and Tiber Valleys.

Montefalco has always been a land of wine, as shown in the splendid frescoes by Benozzo Gozzoli in the apse of the Church of San Francesco that from as early as the 15th century depicted the medieval village surrounded by vines laden with grapes.


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In Montefalco, nature and history share the same table

Montefalco

Originally, it was probably a rural village inhabited by Umbrian populations. In Roman times, the hill was populated by patrician villas, of which there are significant epigraphic and sculptural remains, many in the civic museum, and numerous place names like Assignano, Camiano, Col Verano, Rignano, Satriano, Vecciano. From 1180 we have news of the castrum of Cocoroni (or coronis), which was already a free commune in the 12th century. At the end of 1249, the name changed from Coccorone to Montefalco, according to local tradition, in homage to Frederick II given his well-known passion for hunting with peregrine falcons. In fact, the emperor stayed here in 1240, after having visited Foligno to organise the cities loyal to him against the Papacy.
Between 1320 and 1325 it was the favourite seat of the papal governors of the Duchy of Spoleto. Later, from 1379 to 1424 and again from 1438 to 1439, it was ruled by the Trinci family of Foligno. No longer under the dominion of the Church, it was ruled for a short time by Niccolò Maurizi da Tolentino, who reorganised its administration and divided the territory into four districts. From then on, there was a phase of notable civil, economic and artistic development, interrupted in 1527 by the sacking by Orazio Baglioni's soldiers and a series of plagues. In 1848, the municipal territory expanded, with the addition of the Castles of Fabbri, Fratta and San Luca, which had separated from Trevi following restoration of the Papal States in 1812. Thanks also in exchange for an early painting by Benozzo Gozzoli, previously housed in the Church of San Fortunato, Montefalco obtained the coveted title of city from Pius IX, former Archbishop of Spoleto.

The Sagrantino Road
Cellars, vineyards, typical restaurants, shops and natural beauty. Montefalco preserves the precious roots of Sagrantino, a grape variety cultivated only in these hills. A love for the land and its fruits made up of simple but winning recipes. Visiting the cellars means discovering the essence of Montefalco, the reference point of the wine region where Sagrantino di Montefalco and Montefalco Rosso are produced.
The origins of Sagrantino are still open to debate. One theory links it to the "itriola" vine mentioned by Pliny the Elder, while another, claims it originated in Greece and was imported in the Middle Ages by Byzantine monks. According to others, the grape variety was brought back from Asia Minor around 1400 by Franciscan monks, who made a raisin wine from it for religious rites, hence the name Sagrantino. Although the dry version is currently more popular, Sagrantino also retains its origin as a sweet wine, in which tradition meets modern oenology to guarantee unstoppable success
Typical local produce
Wine, olive oil, cheeses, cured meats, bread and pasta, as well as premium fruit and vegetables. This is the vast panorama of territorial excellences that Montefalco can boast within just a few kilometres.
Let your palate delight in the olive oil, with its intense yellow-green colour and sweetly fruity and intense flavour. It is a food that is a cure for those who eat it.
Alongside this “green gold”, honey is an entirely wholesome product that is result of the diligent care of local beekeepers who continue the tradition of this archaic activity with skill and passion.

Textiles
Local craftsmanship also has pleasant surprises in store for lovers of special workmanship, such as the fine Montefalco fabrics made mainly using natural fibres such as linen and cotton. The traditional "jacquard" process is used to create sheets, bedspreads, towels, curtains, tablecloths and tea towels. The ornamental motifs used include geometric patterns and designs dating back to Romanesque times, as well as more typical motifs similar to those that adorn the finds in the textile collection housed in the Museum Complex of San Francesco


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Experiences and events

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Staff Museo

02/12/2021



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BLIND DATE

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29/10/2021

"The devils of the Museum"

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MONTEFALCO LABORATORY

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11/09/2021

A new model for the management and enhancement of cultural heritage

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06/07/2021

Experiences, Initiatives, Discoveries

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BUY THE TICKET ONLINE

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30/04/2021

Buy your ticket online and skip the queues. Easy, fast and safe.

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NEW VIRTUAL TOUR

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23/04/2021

The whole museum, digitised in very high resolution, so you can enjoy even the smallest details with a new immersive experience

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6036 - Montefalco (PG)

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